Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Guide (3): The Most Recurring Subject

 A Guide to Understanding the Nude in Art (Part 3 of 3)

 Author information:  joellescottgallery  (Richard T. Scott)

The Sculptor and the Nude- Picasso
 I would like to rephrase our original question now in the interest of brevity and to be more specific. "Why is it that the most recurring subject in all of art history by far is the human face and body?" Modern scientific research into the brain also gives us a clue to the reasons behind our question. The human face and the human body are psychologically stimulating to the mind. Our brains are actually hard wired to recognize human form. Take, for example, a chimpanzee. If you look at three different chimps for 5 seconds, would you be able to tell them apart as individuals? Now if you look at three human faces for 5 seconds, I bet your success rate will be much greater. But a chimp can recognize and differentiate between othere chimps much easier, just as you can recognize a human face more easily.

     You might say, Ok I understand why we look at faces, that makes sense, but my question was 'why the nude?'. Well there are multiple reasons. First is tradition. There is a long tradition predating even the Egyptians of recreating the human body. So, as a method of teaching art, there are lots of people who have done it before and so there are a lot of excellent techniques and examples to study. These principles  we learn by studying figurative art can also apply to other forms of art as well. Second, it is a test of skill. If one can make a believable representation of something that we are so familiar with, then everything else is a piece of cake. If I paint a chimp, you would be less critical of whether it looks real than if I painted a human face, simply because most of us don't see chimps every day for our entire lives and we are not hardwired to recognize them in the same way. Some artists get caught up in this challenge for perfection and are never satisfied with their degree of skill (I know I never am) and so continue to pursue the impossible perfection even though most people might not see the minute flaws of the work which the artist does see. -the next passage includes some of my religious opinions on the subject and is not intended to force my views on anyone, merely to share another point of view.-

     Third, (and most importantly to me) the nude, when I choose to paint it, is representative of something more than observation. My works are meant to evoke complex emotions or thoughts in the viewer, and are not meant to be solely decorative, though beauty is important for me and they may be this also. Since nudity is not often seen in normal everyday settings outside of the home, it implies that there is something more to the interpretation of the artwork. It makes the piece more intimate. For me, art is about conveying the complexity of life; its joy and its sorrow. If I paint a nude with a certain degree of sexuality implied, it is to communicate the dual nature of every human being. All of us, from the most pious to the most base, from the greatest ideals of of compassion and love, to fear and jealousy and greed; we are all torn between what we are and what we wish to be. We all have desire to do or see something greater than what is before us, and we all struggle with the desire for immediate pleasure and how they may get in the way of our greater goals. It is this tension between our animal and divine sides that I attempt to evoke; and in doing so, perhaps to help myself and others understand a little bit more about being human.

No comments :

Post a Comment